PUMP up the JAMmie! – Week 8/16

WhoaaaaOOOOOH we’re half way therrrre!! LAWL. OMG. Seriously you guys my first seven marathons and all the work that went into them was all just foundation for THIS training cycle. This shit is bananas and I love it!! Lifelong Endurance is giving me what I’ve asked for.

Monday, May 28theasy day

Scheduled: 10k easy and controlled

I headed out along the Cannery Road and continued all the way to North Pacific Cannery instead of turning around at 5k for a total of 11.2km.

Tuesday, May 29thhard day

  • 5k warm-up
  • 8 x 3:00 ~ 5k pace, 2:00 moderate jog
  • 3k easy

The intervals were challenging today, so much traffic on the highway and it was raining but I took it from Beyond Grit to accept these distractions as extra challenges and got it done! I even felt so good after the 8th rep that I was able to run the last 3k at goal marathon pace, on average. YES.

Next up, swimming lesson 2/4. Awesome!!! After my 30 minute lesson I stayed at the pool for 1400m.

Then I found out a spot opened up in Kristen’s schedule, so I headed for a session with her at 7:30. As always, fan-fking-tastic. Anyone who has me walking on my hands on a treadmill is my kinda person. LOL.


Wednesday, May 30theasy day

When I saw 10k on today’s schedule I did a double take. Usually Wednesdays are my non-running recovery day, but I didn’t question it because my body is feeling good and strong and I’ve fit in some naps this week. Coach says we’re just testing it and to let him know if/when I need a rest.

Thursday, May 31sthard day AND LAST DAY OF FREAKING WORK

  • 5k warm-up
  • 6 x 1K @ 4:22-4:18, 2 min rest
  • 3k cool-down

HOLY!!!! This was awesome. I think it’s worth mentioning a couple of things I noticed.

  1. My self-talk has changed a lot, and for the better. When I first got on the machine I felt so tired and thought about waiting til after work for this shred fest. BUT, I had a dinner date with a colleague, so that was not an option. I literally said out loud to myself, “it’s only been a couple of minutes, give it a chance” and “don’t worry, it always takes a while to warm up this early in the morning” What do you know, by the time I’d run a mile there was a smile spreading across my face and I was rocking out to my Dad’s music! It pays to talk to ourselves as we would to a good friend.
  2. My ability to negotiate with myself has improved. During the fifth of six repeats, I got that sense of giving up, resting, and trying again. I said “no!” out loud more than once, and then I explained to myself that last week I ran this same workout but the intervals were 1600m, so 1000m was SO doable. Then I said the ABC’s in my head and thought of someone I know who started with every letter. Then #5 was done and there was only one more!

Friday, June 1steasy day

After some Skeena River Relay preparations with race co-director Crystal, I got in 10k nice and easy and then a hard nap.

Saturday, June 2ndhard day (race)

hmmm..haha. So today I ran the 21.2k stage of the Skeena Relay. This leg is very PR-supportive. I don’t know if it was realistic of me or not to gun for a sub 1:45, but that was the plan. Considering I’d run 100km in the seven days leading up to this, I think I should have been more careful. Dammit. Good old hindsight. Lifelong Endurance and I aren’t working around these races along the way during Pump Up the JAMmie. Tapering and full rest days around non-goal races just takes away from marathon training. So yeah, I understand why there was no scheduled taper.Β  And I guess the importance of a taper before a hard effort is now knowledge that lives in my muscles, not just a rumour πŸ˜‰

I took the first kilometer, which is uphill, pretty steady, and then found a really good rhythm on the huge 4k downhill. I let my body relax into gravity and things felt good, but I think I ran faster than I should have.

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There are two hills before the course flattens around 10k all the way until the end. The hills felt fine, but I wish I slowed down as soon as the big downhill ended. Once I got over the second hill and onto the river, my pace started to really slip. Legs did not want to turn over and I fell into a ~5:15/km pace that I couldn’t seem to escape. It kinda felt like there was a spell on my body and it wouldn’t do what my brain was telling it to do ahahah

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A headwind wasn’t helping, but I just kept going and enjoying my run, which is something I didn’t know how to do about a year ago when things weren’t going as planned!

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Then I got the stomach ache. FUCKKKKK. I swear I am eating nothing but white rice for 48 hours before my next race. Two very fast, ninja-like pit stops happened between 12k and 15k. What a frustrating waste of precious time..ANYWAYS.

Thanks to my awesome team for the water support (and honking and cheering!!!!) which kept things extra fun, and I was able to pick it up a bit for a strong finish into the transition stage to high-five Marcie and send her on her way for stage 4.

The Skeena River Relay is the best day EVER and I loved every second of it this year, as usual. Here are the Gooeyducks, after Jana finished hard in the tenth and final stage.

Sunday, June 3rdeasy day?

Originally the schedule said 20k easy, so I got a ride out to where I started running yesterday and ran the opposite direction home. I knew from past training runs that it is almost exactly a half marathon. I actually had a solid run, starting easy to see how my body was feeling and then increasing to moderate for the majority of the run.

The run turned red on Training Peaks and then I saw that the schedule had been changed to only 8k!!! WHOOPS.

Yesterday, after my part of the race, I ate a protein bar immediately and drank a ton of water and Gatorade. We snacked all day, ate at the awards banquet, and later when I got home I chugged some green powder, a protein drink, took an ibuprofen and foam rolled my whole body. I will assume this was at least part of why I was able to churn out a sub 2 hour half marathon the day after a race. It felt good.

Week 8 is done and Jack & Jill is 56 days away.

SUMMARY

WEEKLY MILEAGE:Β  103 km

INJURIES/PRE-HAB?Β Β just callous foot

SLEEP?Β Β good but need more

NUTRITION BRAGS?Β  added a calcium supplement, increasing daily protein

CURRENTLY READING:Β  Beyond Grit (I’ll try to finish it soon)

CONFIDENCE BOOSTER(S)

  • huge mileage for me, no pains
  • second fastest half marathon ever, despite a less than ideal day and no taper

NEXT RACE:Β  Scotiabank Vancouver Half Marathon & 5k, June 24th

No clue if I’m racing the half or running some sort of training workout. We’ll see!

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training recap April 3rd-9th & the Prince Rupert Half Marathon!

MONDAY April 3rd

8km easy – Grand Trunk Pathway in Terrace BC, gorgeous TANK TOP weather!

TUESDAY April 4th

Planned: speed workout – 3km easy, [4x2km intervals with 2 min rests,] 3km easy

This was a hard day for me and I’m sad to say I quit early. It just wasn’t happening, I got to the second interval and after a long internal argument I jumped onto the side rails and called it quits. I planned to try again later at the track, but then opted for an easy 8km with my Tenacious 10 partner Whitney.

At the end of the day, I really wished I could have given those intervals another go, but after the first attempt which was about 6km, + the 8km with Whit, I was tired so I slept. In the grand scheme of things, will this affect my performance at my #1 goal race of the season, the Calgary Marathon? Probably not. Coach said it’s all good. Hoping for a confidence booster from my next hard workout which comes on Friday. Moving on!

WEDNESDAY April 5th

Non-running day! One hour of easy yoga was my intention, but that didn’t happen. Jess and Michelle, the PR 1/2 + 8K race directors, myself and Emma were busy putting race packets together and getting organized for Sunday.

Oh OMGΒ  and my TREADMILL was delivered today!!!! I wish I was equally as excited to assemble it…

race prep!

THURSDAY April 6th

6 miles easy at Lakelse Lake! One of my favourite places on Earth ❀ felt good, but slightly heavy. Look at this place!

FRIDAY April 7th

8 mile out-and-back: 4 out, controlled & easy, 4 back @ threshhold pace

The 4 miles back felt impossible. Took a couple breathers which discouraged me, but all in all an excellent workout.

SATURDAY April 8th

Planned: 14 miles (22.5km) nice and easy. Coach Andrew changed this to 10 miles on Friday night due to the struggle on Friday and the half-marathon on Sunday. It was definitely smart and worked in my favour. We are also going to Skype next week and talk about dialing back the weekly mileage just slightly, since the last increase has seemed to cause quite a bit of fatigue.

Ran with my girls Sam and Jess. Jess is co-director of the race this Sunday here where we live, and training for her first half on May 7th! She’s running the BMO Vancouver half and it’s a REALLY good one! I hope the weather for her is better than it was for me in 2014. This run felt great. Amaaaazing sleep on Friday night!!! Then we headed to the Civic Centre for race registration and packet pickup.

SUNDAY April 9th

Prince Rupert 1/2 Marathon! I planned to run to be part of the day and our running community. Running by feel was the plan since it hasn’t been a goal race, and I’ve had some pretty burnt-out feeling workouts lately. We met early, set up the awards area and then headed out the highway to set up the race course.

Coach didn’t delete the training run on Saturday to accomodate this Sunday race. Saturday & Sunday combined serve as a long run; a high mileage weekend in preparation for the Calgary Marathon!

BUT, it was one of those perfect days and everything felt amazing. I felt rested and excited but calm at the same time, and I ended up just shy of a SEVEN minute PR in the half marathon distance!!! BEYOND PUMPED!!!! Such a great check-in with training progress and a crazy confidence booster for my two upcoming races. Could not be happier!!

I have mixed feelings about racing on the highway here where we live, because it’s where every single long run happens every single weekend! Our races are also very small, which obviously feels different than a massive event. This time, however, I tried to see it as a good thing, knowing the course inside out, instead of thinking about it as a drag, knowing where all my least favourite or most challenging segments are. I also reminded myself that I race against myself, and that can be done in any setting.

As commonly happens, myself and many others went out from the starting line a little too quick, but I was super conscious of this and started to hold back soon after starting, to get my heart rate and lungs under control along the first incline. I like to use the McMillan Running Calculator to get a rough idea of the pace I should be okay to run on a day when everything is feeling good, and that was a 5:16/km so I stuck around 5:20 for the first third of the course since everything was feeling REALLY good!!! The “big hill” which is what you see in the middle of the course, is a doozie. Going down is great, and I was sitting at a 5:15 average pace after going down it, but after the halfway turn-around I refused to look at my watch going up that hill. I told myself to just run by feel and keep pushing and doing my best, and that I was allowed to look at the overall average pace once the course had levelled out again for a bit!

I worked my way back to a 5:19/km average by about 17km and then during the last 4ish kilometeres there are some decent declines, and I found some extra gas and kept at it really strong. I just about caught up to the two girls in first place, and in the last 800m or so I tossed my water bottle and literally bolted to chase them down. I can’t believe my 21km split was 4:11 ahaha what the!?

Stealing the win didn’t happen, but that was truly my best effort and I have NO REGRETS, which is a powerful mental tool I’ve learned from following Kelly Roberts. Our club was gracious enough to award TWO gold medals to Erin and Jessie, who finished holding hands and tied for the female winners, so I ended up with silver!!!!!! WOOOOOO!

myself and Jessie, one of the TWO gold medal winners!!

I have never run that pace for that long and I feel really good about this!!! Bring on the next races!!!!!!!!!!!!! Amazing Sunday to finish off a week that felt slightly shakey. I can’t wait for Seattle in less than 2 weeks!

 

Two weeks out from the Tenacious Ten!

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Seven weeks out from the Calgary Marathon!

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Updated – A Rookie’s Guide to the Rupert 8K Road Race and 8 reasons to participate!

First and foremost, let’s get something straight – the term “race” can be very intimidating for anyone who isn’t super competitive, experienced or confident in the activity at hand. BUT, what many new runners aren’t aware of, is that “race day” is totally synonymous with “a fun, organized running event with high energy and community atmosphere providing the opportunity to push a little more than usual, and prove how physically strong and self-willed one can be.” So, going forward, let’s just call it a running EVENT. πŸ™‚

On Sunday, April 8th, it’s the Prince Rupert 1/2 Marathon, two-person 1/2 Marathon Relay, and 8K Road Race hosted by Rupert Runners. Find everything you need to know by clicking the link, and a 2018 registration form specifically, is HERE! Both routes are out-and-back, meaning the finish line is the same place as the starting line. The 21.1km course, which can be run by one person, or shared by two, starts at 10am and the 8km course starts at 11am. The reason this post is focusing on the 8K distance in particular is because the Learn to Run Clinic, hosted annually by Rupert Runners, has been in full swing now since mid-February. Eight kilometres may be a very realistic distance for participants to tackle, come April, whether it’s running, run/walk intervals, or even signing up with the intention to walk and just testing out a few short jogs along the way. That’s right, WALKERS ARE WELCOME! Come one, come all. Also, lots of other runners are coming out of their winter hibernation and 8k is a sweet distance if you aren’t down to run a quarter or half marathon at this point in the year.

So, what can you expect if deciding to participate? First, I advise you to register before hand. This simplifies things for you, and it’s a huge help for the event directors and volunteers. The registration form can be filled out and given with cash or cheque made out to Rupert Runners to any of the club execs, dropped off on Tuesdays or Thursdays from 5 – 5:15pm at the CHSS track before Learn to Run starts (even if you aren’t participating) or, you can mail it in. There will also be an in-person sign up the day before the event. Last year, all runners who registered before race day were entered to win this Momentum Jewelry Motivate Wrap. I am planning another giveaway for this year! OMG what could it BE??

Once you’re all signed up, you can relax until the Saturday before the event, go down to the Civic Centre between 10-noon and pick up your bib (participant number) and souvenir shirt, or you can get it on race day. Again, it’s easier for you and everyone else to grab your stuff before the day of the event. If you don’t live in Prince Rupert, see you Sunday!

Sunday Runday!

The 8K begins at 11am this year. Sometime prior to that you’ll decide what you want to wear on your run, taking the weather into consideration and planning to leave something in your vehicle/a friend’s vehicle for after you finish. You may want to bring your own water bottle too, even though there will be water and snacks provided after.

Common question: Do I wear the race shirt in the run?

Answer: a general running rule is never try anything new on race day. Clothes, food, shoes, etc. But it’s totally up to you!

There is an awards ceremony post-race for overall and category winners, plus TONS of door prizes, so stick around! Once your body cools down you’ll want a hoodie or jacket, and maybe some sweats. When you’ve decided what top you’d like to run in, you’ll pin your bib onto the FRONT of your shirt (or shorts/pants if you prefer). The bib goes on the front because as you are finishing the course, the volunteers in charge of timing need to be able to see it clearly. Four safety pins will be provided to you.

Bibs also make good keepsakes!

Other things to pay attention to on Sunday morning are staying hydrated and eating breakfast a few hours before hand. Bland is good. You can use the bathroom before, washrooms available inside the Lester Centre as well as the Civic Centre.

Since the 1/2 marathon and relay start first, at ten, this is a great opportunity to get down to the Lester Centre nice and early to give yourself time to take in the energy of the event, cheer as 1/2 runners take off, chat with friends, and warm up. Oh, and to park, if you’re driving.

Please, don’t think that warming up for a race means you are “super hardcore” and trying to win or break records or something. Warming up is necessary to prevent injury, feel ready, and so that you don’t give your body a rude awakening sending it from resting to a high heart-rate in just a few seconds! Try a short, easy jog part way down Wantage Road or even just in the parking lot, then twirl the ankles, try some leg swings front to back and side to side while hanging on to something for support, grape-vine, high knees, butt kicks, whatever gets you warmed up, and then some stretching is okay after your muscles are no longer cold.

When 11am approaches, 8K participants gather in the little undercover drop-off area in front of the Lester Center entrance. This is the same place the first race started, so if you are there early you can see how it goes down, but it’s nothing fancy or complicated whatsoever. You’ll see a big timing clock set up and cones and volunteers in vests. Once you begin, you’ll run out onto the highway keeping on the right side of the road, and staying on that side after turning around at the half-way point, which is just a little further than the turn off to the Industrial Site. There is no crossing of the highway. WOOO. If you think you’re nervous, try converting it to excited.

The Course!

Think of this course as SIX parts. Six manageable chunks, many of which you have already run, or will before April, if you take part in Learn to Run.

1/6: Lester Centre to BC Hydro

  • try not to fly out of the starting area!
  • this is a time to see how you feel, settle in, find your breath
  • yes, it starts on an uphill, but you got it

first part

[Phuong Nguyen Photo]

2/6: BC Hydro to the SPCA

  • downhill, yayaa! A reward for your initial climb
  • if you’re feeling a little out of breath from that first incline, this is a great place to let your heart rate and breath stabilize. Relax and breathe.

8k

enjoying the descent! [Phuong Nguyen Photo]

3/6: SPCA to the half-way turnaround point!

  • if you are in Learn to Run, you’ll have experience on this hill by April
  • slow and steady, maintain your effort level, not necessarily your pace
  • shorten your stride slightly and use your arms to work your way up the hill
  • don’t hunch – it squishes your lungs
  • there is a water station at the half-way point πŸ™‚

4/6: Half-way mark back down to the SPCA

  • turn around and run back down that glorious hill you tackled!!
  • look around, take it in. We live in a beautiful place and this is fun!
  • stay in control of your body on the downhill by engaging your core

5/6: SPCA to BC Hydro

  • This is a sneaky hill, not steep, but still a hill. You can do this.
  • Tell yourself it’s the last uphill
  • Once you get to that Hydro turn off, which is now on your left, it’s all downhill to the finish-line!

coming back

6/6: Ya buddy. Back to the Lester Centre! DOWNHILL TO THE FINISH!!!

  • if you are feeling good, give yourself permission to go a little faster now
  • smile and be proud of yourself!

race

half marathon finisher killin’ it [Phuong Nguyen Photo]

Cross the finish line, which is exactly where you started, and keep moving so you don’t get in the way of any runners who may be behind you. Make your way to some water and a snack, usually in the lobby. Giving your body calories within 30 minutes of working hard is important.

Take some pics! Did you know runners are 89.3% more obsessed with Instagram than non-runners? Do some stretching, walk around, and find those warm clothes you packed for after you finished kicking ass. That’s right, YOU KICK ASS!

Jamie’s 8 Reasons to Run the PR 8K Road Race

  1. Because you are stronger than you think
  2. To take part in a community event
  3. To get some exercise
  4. There are really awesome door prizes! (local too)
  5. Get out of your comfort zone, it’s good for us all! Do something different
  6. To feel proud and ride an endorphin-high ALL day
  7. Do something outdoors in Spring weather
  8. WHY NOT? here’s the registration form!

If you have any questions that this post isn’t answering, contact me and I’ll find answers for you. Hope to see you there! If you know anyone who may benefit from reading this, please share! And one more time, here’s the event link!prhalf

cross your fingers for weather like 2016! [Phuong Nguyen Photo]

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